Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Psychology

Date of Defense

5-12-2016

Graduate Advisor

John P. Meriac, Ph.D.

Committee

Natalie Bolton

Scott Soltis, Ph.D

Deborah Balser, Ph.D.

Abstract

While the positive outcomes of feedback in the workplace have been supported in previous research, there is still a lack of theoretical unity explaining how and why feedback may be advantageous. In addition, previous studies examining the effects of feedback have resulted in mixed findings. Two studies were conducted to clarify the conditions for valuable feedback by proposing and empirically testing two models examining relationships between feedback environments and outcomes. The first study examined performance outcomes related to a supportive feedback environment while the second study examined attitudinal outcomes associated with a supportive feedback environment. Results of both studies indicate that a feedback environment is related to several positive performance and attitudinal outcomes, as well as mediating variables. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the strength of supportive feedback environments.

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Psychology Commons

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