Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Nursing

Date of Defense

12-11-2015

Graduate Advisor

Anne Fish

Co-Advisor

Bachman, Jean

Committee

John Henschke

Calvert, Wilma

Abstract

Centers for Disease Control (2011a) Surveillance report revealed African American women comprised 63% of new HIV cases among women; 65% of African American women were infected with HIV transmitted by heterosexual sex; yet represent 13% of the female population in the United States. An existing data set was examined from a sample of 761 African American women with a history of drug use at high risk to acquire or transmit HIV and/or STDs to determine 751 women’s knowledge and attitudes about risky sexual behaviors, factors influencing a decision to HIV test, and the influence of sex trading on the decision to HIV test. Binary logistic regression predicted a small percentage of women’s decision to HIV test was influenced by knowledge of risky sexual behaviors (Naegelkerke R2, = .100). There were significant difference in the number HIV tests for women who reported cheating on a steady sex partner (M = 4.25, SD =7.49) versus women who did not cheat (M = 3.28, SD = 4.67), t(747) = - 2.19, p = .03. Binary logistic regression predicted a minor percentage of women’s decision to HIV test was influenced by women’s attitudes about risky sexual behavior (Nagelkerke R2 = .043). Women who agreed with the statement, I have risk drug behaviors that need changing were predicted to be twice as likely to HIV teste Exp [B] = 1.829, 95% CI [1.018, 3.288]. Binary logistic regression predicted an increased 15.3% variation in the decision to HIV test is influenced by women’s knowledge to prevent HIV and attitudes about risky sexual behavior (Nagelkerke R2 = .153). Women who agreed with the knowledge item, asked their partner if they were HIV positive, were 1.3 times more likely, and women who agree with the knowledge statement, I have risky drug behaviors that need changing, increased to 1.9 times more likely to HIV test. There were significant differences in number of HIV tests for women who engaged in sex-trading versus women who do not engage in sex-trading. Tailored strategies that determine unique needs of African American women to reduce risky sex an increase HIV testing are recommended.

Included in

Nursing Commons

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