Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Education, Counseling

Date of Defense

12-11-2014

Graduate Advisor

R. Rocco Cottone

Committee

Robertson, David

Susan Kashubeck-West, Ph.D.

Mark Pope, Ed.D.

Virginia Navarro, Ph.D.

Abstract

The present study surveyed men to assess whether any correlations existed between a man’s sexually addictive behavior and how his family-of-origin addressed sexuality along with demographic factors. A total of 374 male participants (18 years or older) provided complete data sets via the online survey located on SurveyMonkey. The main research question for this study was as follows: Is there a relationship between demographic variables or family factors: (a) negative attitudes and communication about sexuality in one’s family-of-origin, (b) exposure to sexual stimuli in one’s family-of-origin, and (c) open sexual discussion in one’s family-of-origin, and sexual addiction. All three of the hypotheses of this study were supported. Hypothesis 1 predicted that higher levels of negative attitudes and communication about sexuality in one’s family-of-origin would correlate positively to a measure of sexual addiction. Hypothesis 2 predicted that higher levels of exposure to sexual stimuli in one’s family-of-origin would correlate positively to a measure of sexual addiction. Hypothesis 3 predicted that less open sexual discussion in one’s family-of-origin would correlate positively to a measure of sexual addiction. Data collection was accomplished by self-report surveys, Sexual Addiction Screening Test (SAST, Carnes, 1989), Family Sexuality Scale – Revised (FSS-R, Pfuetze & Cottone, 2013) and a demographic questionnaire. The FSS-R is a Likert-type scale that measures how one’s family-of-origin handled the topic of sexuality. Correlational analysis was used to analyze whether there was a relationship between a man’s sexually addictive behavior and how his family-of-origin handled sexuality.

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