Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Education

Major

Education

Date of Defense

4-17-2012

Graduate Advisor

Kathleen Sullivan Brown, Ph.D.

Committee

Althof, Wolfgang

Dolan, Margaret

Murphy, Carole

Abstract

Teacher grading practices and student motivation continue to be important topics in education and research. Although studies have documented teacher grading practices and strategies to increase student motivation, few studies have analyzed teacher perceptions of grading practices and teacher perceptions of student motivation and the relationship between these two perceptions. This quantitative study examined the relationship between secondary teacher perceptions of grading practices and secondary teacher perceptions of student motivation. By using data from two instruments, the Teachers’ Perceptions of Grading Practices (TPGP) questionnaire and the Perceptions of Student Motivation (PSM) questionnaire, this study examined the relationship between teacher perceptions of grading practices and student motivation. Results include descriptive statistics regarding demographic differences in perceptions, and a multivariate (MANOVA) analysis to analyze any differences in perceptions amongst different groups based on demographic data. This study focused on 307 secondary school teachers in four Midwest counties because of these teachers’ impact on the decision students make to drop out or stay in school. Results indicate overall correlations between teacher perceptions of grading practices and student motivation, as well as correlations between individual factors of grading and individual factors of student motivation. Results also indicate statistically significant differences in mean scores of perceptions between genders, experience levels, and subject area taught for both grading practice and student motivation.

Included in

Education Commons

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