Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts

Major

Political Science

Date of Defense

11-16-2011

Graduate Advisor

David C. Kimball, Ph.D.

Committee

Kenneth Thomas

Martin Rochester

Ruth Iyob

Abstract

This study uses time-series cross-sectional logistic and OLS regressions to analyze data on foreign assistance and governance in Sub-Saharan Africa to determine the impact of different methods of foreign aid on democracy and democratic characteristics in Sub-Saharan Africa. Even though all foreign assistance has the end goal of promoting democratic growth, different aid targeted sectors have varying effects on democracy. The research has found that aid targeting social infrastructure, specifically health and government sectors, in Sub-Saharan Africa has a substantial, positive effect on democracy and democratic characteristics while economic infrastructure aid has no effect. This analysis could have an impact on future aid allocation by promoting aid specialization for social infrastructure.

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