Document Type

Dissertation

Degree

Doctor of Philosophy

Major

Education, Educational Psychology

Date of Defense

10-14-2004

Graduate Advisor

Margaret W. Cohen, Ph.D.

Committee

Cody Ding, Ph.D.

Therese Macan, Ph.D.

Virginia Navarro, Ph.D.

Abstract

This research was a field-based investigation into the impact of written feedback on students' perceptions, motivation, and academic performance. Seventy-nine fourth grade students, from five elementary classrooms participated in two studies. Study 1 (n=15) was an ABAB-type, reversal design, intended to provide support for a cause-and-effect relationship between feedback scores (i.e., a rubric-based evaluation of teacher's written feedback) and feedback effectiveness (i.e., a survey-based measure of students' views on the value of written feedback). Study 2 (n=64) was a quasi-experimental study intended to demonstrate: a) the relationship between feedback scores and feedback effectiveness, b) an association between feedback effectiveness and academic motivation, c) an association between feedback effectiveness and academic performance, and d) a curvilinear relationship between assignment grade and feedback scores. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) confirmed that the experimental group reported a significantly higher level of Learning Goal Orientation, one aspect of academic motivation (p<.05). A General Linear Model Repeated Measures procedure found support for relationships between feedback scores and feedback effectiveness, and between assignment grade and feedback scores. The research was unable to demonstrate a relationship between feedback effectiveness and academic performance. The potential motivational and educational benefits of enhanced written feedback are discussed, and recommendations for implementation are offered.

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Education Commons

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