Authors

Lena Larsson, Heart Center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Bengt Johansson, Heart Center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Camilla Sandberg, Heart Center and Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
Silke Apers, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Adrienne Kovacs, Peter Munk Cardiac Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Koen Luyckx, School Psychology and Development in Context, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Corina Thomet, Center for Congenital Heart Disease, Inselspital — Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland
Werner Budts, Division of Congenital and Structural Cardiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
Junko Enomoto, Department of Adult Congenital Heart Disease, Chiba Cardiovascular Center, Chiba, Japan
Maayke Sluman, Department of Cardiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands
Jou-Kou Wang, Department of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
Jamie Jackson, Center for Biobehavioral Health, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, OH, USA
Paul Khairy, Adult Congenital Heart Center, Montreal Heart Institute, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada
Stephen Cook, Adult Congenital Heart Disease Center, Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Luis Alday, Division of Cardiology, Hospital de Niños, Córdoba, Argentina
Katrine Eriksen, Department of Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway
Mikael Dellborg, Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Malin Berghammer, Centre for Person-Centred Care (GPCC), University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden
Gwen Rempel, Northern Alberta Adult Congenital Heart Clinic, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Samuel Menahem, Monash Heart, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
Maryanne Caruana, Mater Dei Hospital
Martha Tomlin, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Alexandra Soufi, Department of Congenital Heart Disease, Louis Pradel Hospital, Hospices civils de Lyon, Lyon, France
Susan Fernandes, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital
Kamila White, University of Missouri–St. Louis
Edward Callus, University of Milan
Shelby Kutty, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Philip Moons, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, KU Leuven, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Background: Physical activity is important to maintain and promote health. This is of particular interest in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) where acquired heart disease should be prevented. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends a minimum of 2.5 h/week of physical activity exceeding 3 metabolic equivalents (METS) to achieve positive health effects. It is unknown whether physical activity levels (PAL) in adult CHD patients differ by country of origin. Methods: 3896 adults with CHD recruited from 15 countries over 5 continents completed self-reported instruments, including the Health Behaviour Scale (HBS-CHD), within the APPROACH-IS project. For each patient, we calculated whether WHO recommendations were achieved or not. Associated factors were investigated using Generalized Linear Mixed Models. Results: On average, 31% reached the WHO recommendations but with a great variation between geographical areas (India: 10%–Norway: 53%). Predictors for physical activity level in line with the WHO recommendations, with country of residence as random effect, were male sex (OR 1.78, 95%CI 1.52–2.08), NYHA-class I (OR 3.10, 95%CI 1.71–5.62) and less complex disease (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.16–1.83). In contrast, older age (OR 0.97, 95%CI 0.96–0.98), lower educational level (OR 0.41, 95%CI 0.26–0.64) and being unemployed (OR 0.57, 95%CI 0.42– 0.77) were negatively associated with reaching WHO recommendations. Conclusions: A significant proportion of patients with CHD did not reach the WHO physical activity recommendations. There was a large variation in physical activity level by country of origin. Based on identified predictors, vulnerable patients may be identified and offered specific behavioral interventions.

Publication Date

March 2019

Publication Title

IJC Heart & Vasculature

Volume

22

First Page

20

Last Page

25

DOI

10.1016/j.ijcha.2018.11.004

Comments

10.1016/j.ijcha.2018.11.004

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Repository URL

https://irl.umsl.edu/psychology-faculty/68